Aconcagua Climbing: The aconcagua will always be part of me

Aconcagua Climbing: The aconcagua will always be part of me

Trying to do an Aconcagua expedition is very important, and you must bear in mind that you will need Aconcagua mountain guides in most cases. This ascent began with a backward path in scree to a saddle between Aconcagua and Ameghino. In the saddle, we were whipped by a strong wind, and the remaining thousand feet of elevation gain was a bit more challenging to compete with the wind and begin to feel the altitude. Camp 2 offers beautiful views of the Andes, and being at the base of the Polish glacier, just 3,600 feet below the summit, was exciting. The return to camp 1 was rapid as we cut off many of the changes and just made our way down the scree fields. We then had a day off at Camp 1 and spoke with Joel Gratz from Opensnow.com, who assured us that Sunday, January 6, seemed like a perfect day for the summit. Usually, there seems to be a point in a climb where you start to feel like the summit can become a reality. I will not say I am confident that I will make it to the top because I am always cautious about taking on anything in the mountains. But often, when you’re progressing up high, feeling healthy, and getting a good weather forecast, it’s a sign that things are starting to line up, and your chances of reaching the top are good. Also, we could spend an hour or so with our good friends Rob and Alex, who were leaving their gear at camp 1 and heading back to base camp. We returned to Camp 2 on January 4. It seemed to be just us, Jordan and Richard (Nick decided not to continue carrying to Camp 2). Many groups have started using the Guanaco route, which offers a third camp and a shorter day to the summit. Sleeping at 19,200 ′ was not the calmest night due to headaches, wind, three people in the tent, and low temperatures. We woke up to cloudy skies, but we remained optimistic that the forecast would be correct and the winds would abate. The beginning of our day off slowly passed as we organized our gear and listened to Bob Dylan from the nearby Jordan store. Then, just as we were starting to think about dinner, the afternoon turned into a whirlwind. Dominique came to our store with bad news, a weather forecast that predicted peak temperatures of -30 ° F to -40 ° F with wind chill on Sunday, followed by a storm front that would bring 80 km/hr winds into Camp 2. He reported that even if they could make it to the top, he wouldn’t expect Richard to go from the top to Camp 1, and he didn’t want to be caught at Camp 2 with such horrendous winds. Jordan was not available to confirm this forecast, and we are faced with a difficult decision. Usually, when climbing, the safe decision is the correct one. Before we knew it, we had packed all our gear and were heading towards base camp. After this experience, I stopped wondering how to climb Aconcagua; I had just lived it.

Matif83

Author Since: June 29, 2020

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